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, as we said, but, you know, as we said, the terrell?continues. >> susan, thank you so much. >>> to syria now. cbs has learned that the u.s. has discovered they have prepared chemical weapons that could potentially beused against the opposition. right now there are no indications that any of those chemicals could be fixed on military aircraft. meanwhile the obama administration says essentially countries in the middle east have offered asylum to assad and his family. assad has repeatedly said he will not leave syria. the u.s. said he will be accountable for the battle against the syria people. >>> overnight the political turmoil in egypt has turned deadly. they have been secured to security the presidential palace. state tv says at least five people and supporters were killed when they fought in front of the presidential palace in cairo. the army used tanks and troops to control the situation. >>> software guru john mcafee spent the night in a guatemalan jail. he was arrested yesterday for entering the country illegally. he said he crossed the border from belize to seek asylum. he's wante
, and for a 30-day free trial, go to axiron.com. >> axelrod: russia's foreign minister says syria's arsenal of chemical weapons is "under control" in two locations. sergei lavrov calls the conflict in syria, not in it's 21st month, a stalemate. he says that "any country wanting to offer sanctuary to syria's president bashar al- assad, should ask him directly. russia is not getting involved." this christmas season, peace on earth seems more elusive than ever. earlier today, i spoke with former undersecretary of state nicholas burns and asked who, if anyone, will be the peace makers? >> when i was growing up listening to people like lyndon baines johnson or richard nixon or hubert humphrey, kennedy, eisenhower before that, their mantra was the highest aspiration of our society should be peace. it's interesting since 9/11 our political leaders have stopped telling us that. it's time they started reminding us again. the ancient elusive goal of peace, it's part of the american tradition. it's part of who we are as a country. >> axelrod: so if the mechanisms of security have to do with the proper
afghan civilians also died. nato says the base was not breached. in syria two car bombs exploded today in the city of homs. at least 15 were killed there, and dozens of others wounded. and fighting also intense five-- intensified around damascus. as kelly cobiella reports rebels are closing in on the capitol. >> reporter: for the first time rebels are challenging the syrian army for control of the main airport. street battles have grounded flights for three days. rebels have also taken control of two military bases. and appear to be planning a push into the center of damascus. assad's army answered with rockets and bombs today. so far the regime has managed to stop an attack on the city and retains control of the airport. but for how long? andrew tabler is an analyst at the washington institute for near east policy. >> the rebels have been able to harass the capital as well as the supply chain for several days. and this is unprecedented in the history of syria. and it's another sign that the assad regime is going to contract and eventually perhaps on its way out. >> the last time rebel
is better than none. >> pelley: elaine, thank you. syria's civil war is getting closer to the dictator. today there were battles between the assad military and rebels around the capital, damascus, a mortar slammed into a school near the capital, killing at least nine students. it's not clear who fired it. outside journalists rarely get inside syria, but our elizabeth palmer reached damascus and the families suffering there. >> reporter: this is the new normal in damascus: going to work past military checkpoints. random explosions and heavily armed soldiers. trying to ignore the charred wreckage of car bombs, knowing there will be others which could explode any time, anywhere. a twin blast in a neighborhood last week killed more than 30 people. the community rallied to repair shattered windows and walls, but any feeling of security is gone. across the capital, people are gradually adjusting to the encroaching war. "my children don't go to school any more" this man told me. "and everyday we hear the noise of shelling all around us." does it scare you at night? >> of course, i'm not scare
pushing them all the rails. nbc news correspondent richard engel is free from his captors in syria. we'll have that story next. 'll have that story next. with . the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to t÷+e clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrict
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5